Dancing in the Inns of CourtsDancing in the Inns of Courts

Depuis la fin du 13ème siècle et jusqu’à nos jours, l’appellation Inns of Courts recouvre la même réalité : celle d’une institution londonienne rassemblant les professionnels du droit. Cette institution regroupe différents collèges assurant la formation des futurs magistrats et des hommes de loi en général et fonctionnant aussi comme des clubs et des ordres disciplinaires.
Depuis l’origine, les quatre collèges les plus importants sont Inner Temple et Middle Temple qui s’installent dans des bâtiments confisqués à l’ordre du Temple, Lincoln’s Inn dont l’histoire est liée à celle d’Henry de Lacy, troisième conte de Lincoln, tout comme l’histoire de Gray’s Inn est liée à celle de la puissante famille des Gray.

:

Appearing at the end of the 13th century and still going strong, the Inns of Court are a professional association for barristers and judges, made up of several London establishments, providing training for future lawyers and magistrates, as well as club facilities, and having disciplinary functions over its members .

The four main colleges were and remain Inner Temple and Middle Temple that use buildings confiscated from the Order of Knight Templars, Lincoln’s Inn named after Henry de Lacy, third Earl of Lincoln, and Gray’s Inn associated with the powerful Gray family.

Many well-known names are to be found in the registers of the Inns of Court from the 16th century to present days. Statesmen (Thomas More, Lord Burleigh and Lord Walsingham – Tony Blair and about 15 Prime Ministers – Mahatma Ghandi); writers, poets and explorers (Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins – John Donne and Sir Walter Raleigh); many crowned heads, sometimes honorary members (James II, George VI, Edward VII, the Duke of Edinburgh and Princess Diana). Shakespeare is said to have first played his “Comedy of Errors” in the hall of Gray’s Inn, well known for the quality of its shows, as witnessed by “Graies Inn’s Maske”, the last but one dance published by John Playford in 1651.

 

From the Middle Ages to the Restoration, the Inns of Court were places of power and influence, training the men who would represent the King in the counties. Their wealth and history were celebrated with yearly festivities, in particular “All Hallows” on November 1st and “Candlemas” on February 2nd. Between Christmas and the first days of January splendid Masques were also organized there, rivaling those of the Royal Court.

 

A series of six manuscripts were found in the Inns of Court’s libraries, lists of dances and of books belonging to three members of the Inns of Court or some of their relatives. In spite of being a century apart (the oldest manuscript dates back to 1570, the latest one 1675), the same eight dances are found on the lists; they were eventually called “the olde Measures”.

In all six manuscripts, in spite of the time difference, the eight dances are described in the same way, meaning they had eventually become the unavoidable rite to start “The Solemn Revels”. Younger members of the Inns of Court, to whom the first edition of the “Dancing Master” is dedicated, were expected to have trained for the dances, mastered the complicated sequel of moves, and dance properly. Thus Bulsrode Whitelock, who was to become Cromwell’s counselor, wrote about the 1628 Christmas Revels in Middle Temple:

« theis measures were wont to be trulie danced, it beinge accounted a shame for an innes of Court man not to have learned to dance, especially the measures, but nowe their dancing is tourned to bare walking ».  

Here is the list of all eight measures found in the Inns of Court libraries :

The Quadrian Pavan, Turkylonye, The Earle of Essex Measure, Tinternell, The Old Almayne, The Queen’s Almayne, Sicilia Almayne ou Madam Cicillia Pavin, The Black Almain.

Thanks to the manuscripts and the carefully described dances, we have a link between dances known at the end of the 15th and 16th century and the English dance repertoire published as late as 1651 but already taking shape in the late years  of Elizabeth I’s reign.

 

Starting in the last third of the 16th century, measure is synonymous with the two major dance forms of the time: Pavans and Almans. However measure also means a long or short series of choreographic moves made up of a random sequel of singles and doubles.

It is thus close to the 15th century “basse danse”, except basse danses were built according to rules that, although complicated, were memory aids.

 

The first Inns of Court manuscript, “The Gunter MS” still includes some basse danse vocabulary such as “repryme”, a word that is not found in later documents.

 

Here is for instance the description of My lord of Essex Measure:

”A duble forward repryme backe 4 tymes / 2 singles syde a duble forward repryme back”

 

Let us now compare the six choreographic “measures” of « la basse dance du Roy Despaingne » found in the BD manuscript of the Burgundy library (last third of the 15th century), (1), with the four or I would say five choreographic measures of “la longue pavian”, in the Gunter MS, around 1572

 (1)    R b ss ddd rrr b/ ss ddd r b/ ss ddd rrr b/ ss d r d r b/ ss ddd rrr b/
      ss d r d r bc.

 (2)     2 singles a duble forward 2 singles syde reprime backe once/ 2 singles syde a duble forward repryme back twyse/2 singles a duble forward one single backe twyse 2 singles a duble forward 2 singles side reprime backe once/ 2 singles side a double forward reprime backe twyse.

 Or, using the same abbreviations as for a basse danse :

 ss d ss r/ss d r ss d r /ss d s ss d s/ ss d ss r/ss d r ss d r.

 

Besides seeming to be the missing link between society dances that, with variations, were fashionable in Europe at the end of the 16h  century, and the specifically English repertoire taking shape in the reign of the first Stuarts, the Inns of Court measures greatly help us understand the dances collected by John Playford:

they give us all-important precisions about which foot to start with for simples and doubles, in particular in the « compulsory figures » found in all dances. Thus the sixth measure « The Queens Almayne »  seems a typical  dd ssd – dd ssd sequence, found in so many dances of the early editions of the « Dancing Master ».

 

Try and compare « The Queens Almayne » in its Ashmole version, a manuscript dated 1634 (1), and the later version of Buttler  Buggins (2) with the choreography of « A Health to Betty », a first edition dance (3).

(1)   A duble forward and a duble backe set two singles and face to face and turne a round in your owne place a duble forward with the right legge and backe with the left legge set two singles face to face and turn a double round…

(2)   A double forwards and a double back with the left legg turne face to face, and set and turn with the left legg/ A double forward and a double back with the right legg turn face to face and sett and turn with the right legge

Last but not least, here is the original description of  « The Black Almain », also from the Buttler Buggins manuscript:

 

Syde 4 double round about the hall

And close the last double face to

Face. Then part your hands and goe all

A double back one from another and

Meet a double againe, The goe a

Double to the left hand and

As much back to the right hand

The all on the Wome side stand still

and the men set and turne

then all the men stand still and

the women sett and turne, theb hold

both hands and change places with a

double and slide four French slides to the

mans right hand change places againe

with a double and slyde 4 french slides

to the right hand again, then

part hands and goe back a double one

from another and meande a double again.

Then all this measure once over and soe on.

The 2nd all the men stand still and the

Women begin sett and turne first and then

Men last

 

(spelling and page setting as in the original text)


Du 16ème siècle à nos jours, beaucoup de noms célèbres émaillent les registres de l’un ou l’autre des collèges : des hommes d’état (Thomas More, Lord Burleigh et Lord Walsingham – Tony Blair et une quinzaine de premiers ministres – le Mahatma Ghandi), des écrivains des poètes et des explorateurs (Charles Dickens et Wilkie Collins – John Donne et sir Walter Raleigh), beaucoup de têtes couronnées, parfois à titre honorifique (Jacques II, Georges VI, Edouard VII, l’actuel Prince consort et la Princesse Diana). Shakespeare aurait créé la « Comédie des erreurs » dans le hall de Gray’s Inn, particulièrement réputé pour la qualité de ses spectacles, comme le rappelle « Graies Inn’s Maske », l’avant dernière danse éditée par John Playford en 1651.

Du Moyen âge jusqu’à la Restauration, les Inns of Courts vont représenter des lieux de pouvoir et d’influence considérables puisqu’on y formait ceux qui allaient représenter la couronne dans les comtés. On célébrait la richesse et la pérennité de l’institution à travers de grandes fêtes annuelles, notamment celles ayant lieu le 1er novembre pour « All Hallows » et le 2 février pour « Candlemas » . On y organisait aussi des masques somptueux rivalisant avec ceux de la cour entre Noël et les premiers jours de janvier.

Dans les bibliothèques des Inns of Courts, on a retrouvé une série de six manuscrits se présentant comme des documents annotés, des listes de danses et des livres ayant appartenu à trois membres des Inns of Courts ou à certains de leurs proches.
Quoiqu’un siècle sépare les manuscrits en question (le plus ancien datant de 1570 alors que le plus récent date de 1675), on y trouve listées huit danses qu’on finira par appeler « The olde Measures ».
D’un manuscrit à l’autre, malgré la disparité des époques de référence, ces huit danses sont décrites de la même manière : c’est qu’avec le temps, elles sont devenues le rituel incontournable par lequel « The Solemn Revels » (les fêtes solennelles) se devaient de commencer. On attendait des jeunes gentlemen des Inns of Court, auxquels est adressée la dédicace de la première édition du « Dancing Master », qu’ils se soient exercés à ces danses, qu’ils aient mémorisé leur déroulement complexe et qu’ils les dansent sans laisser-aller, comme le rappelle Bulstrode Whitelocke, futur conseiller de Cromwell, relatant les festivités de Noël 1628 dans Middle temple :
« theis measures were wont to be trulie danced, it beinge accounted a shame for an innes of Court man not to have learned to dance, especially the measures, but nowe their dancing is tourned to bare walking ».

Voici la liste des huit measures retrouvées dans les bibliothèques des Inns of Courts :
The Quadrian Pavan, Turkylonye, The Earle of Essex Measure, Tinternell, The Old Almayne, The Queen’s Almayne, Sicilia Almayne ou Madam Cicillia Pavin, The Black Almain.
Ces manuscrits et les danses qu’ils décrivent consciencieusement nous permettent de faire le lien entre les répertoires de la fin du 15ème siècle et de la fin du 16ème siècle et le répertoire des danses anglaises publié tardivement en 1651 mais déjà en voie de constitution dès la fin du règne de la reine Elizabeth I.
A partir du dernier tiers du 16ème siècle, measure est en Angleterre employée comme synonyme pour les deux formes majeures des danses de société de l’époque : la pavane et l’allemande. Mais elle désigne aussi une plus ou moins longue série de séquences chorégraphiques constituée à partie d’une distribution aléatoire de simples et doubles.
En tant que telle, elle se rapproche beaucoup de la « basse danse » du 15ème siècle, à ceci près que les « basses danses » observaient des règles de construction qui, tout en étant assez sophistiquées, pouvaient au moins soulager la mémoire des danseurs.
Le premier manuscrit des Inns of Courts : « The Gunter MS » permet de constater qu’on y utilise encore certains termes relevant de la terminologie de la « basse danse », comme par exemple la reprise. Ce terme disparaîtra par la suite.
Voici par exemple la description de My lord of Essex measure :
”A duble forward repryme backe 4 tymes / 2 singles syde a duble forward repryme back”

Comparez maintenant les six « mesures » chorégraphiques de « la basse dance du Roy Despaingne » répertoriée dans le manuscrit dit des Basses Danses de la bibliothèque de Bourgogne – dernier tiers du 15ème siècle (1) avec les quatre ou, à mon sens, cinq mesures chorégraphiques de « la longe pavian » (2) toujours tirée du « Gunter MS » – vers 1572.
(1) R b ss ddd rrr b/ ss ddd r b/ ss ddd rrr b/ ss d r d r b/ ss ddd rrr b/
ss d r d r bc.
(2) 2 singles a duble forward 2 singles syde reprime backe once/ 2 singles syde a duble forward repryme back twyse/2 singles a duble forward one single backe twyse 2 singles a duble forward 2 singles side reprime backe once/ 2 singles side a double forward reprime backe twyse.
ou, si j’utilise les abréviations utilisées pour noter les basses danses :
ss d ss r/ss d r ss d r /ss d s ss d s/ ss d ss r/ss d r ss d r.

Outre le fait que la mesure semble être le chaînon manquant entre les répertoires des danses de société en vogue, avec des variantes, dans les sociétés de la fin du 16ème siècle en Europe et le répertoire spécifiquement anglais qui s’organise sous le règne des premiers rois Stuart, les mesures des Inns of Courts apportent un éclairage intéressant et même décisif pour comprendre les danses répertoriées par John Playford.
En effet, ces documents apportent des précisions essentielles concernant les pieds de départ des simples et des doubles, notamment dans les « figures imposées » qu’on retrouve dans toutes les danses. Dans ces conditions, la sixième mesure « The Queens Almayne », apparaît comme le prototype de la séquence dd ssd – dd ssd qu’on trouve dans de si nombreuses danses des premières éditions du « Dancing Master ».
Comparez donc « The queens Almayne » dans la version du Ashmole, manuscrit daté de 1634 (1), et celle plus tardive de Buttler Buggins (2) avec la partition chorégraphique de « A Health to Betty », danse de la première édition (3).
(1) A duble forward and a duble backe set two singles and face to face and turne a round in your owne place a duble forward with the right legge and backe with the left legge set two singles face to face and turn a double round…
(2) A double forwards and a double back with the left legg turne face to face, and set and turn with the left legg/ A double forward and a double back with the right legg turn face to face and sett and turn with the right legge…

(3) Partition originale de « A Health to Betty »

Voici pour finir la description originale de « The Black Almain », tirée elle aussi du manuscrit de Buttler Buggins :

Syde 4 double round about the hall
And close the last double face to
Face. Then part your hands and goe all
A double back one from another and
Meet a double againe, The goe a
Double to the left hand and
As much back to the right hand
The all on the Wome side stand still
and the men set and turne
then all the men stand still and
the women sett and turne, theb hold
both hands and change places with a
double and slide four French slides to the
mans right hand change places againe
with a double and slyde 4 french slides
to the right hand again, then
part hands and goe back a double one
from another and meete a double again.
Then all this measure once over and soe on.
The 2nd all the men stand still and the
Women begin sett and turne first and then
Men last

(Il a été tenu compte des variations de graphie et de mise en page du texte original)

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Plugin for Social Media by Acurax Wordpress Design Studio
Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On FacebookVisit Us On Youtube